writing-questions-answered

writing-questions-answered:

glorianas
Real isn’t how you are made. It’s a thing that happens to you. Sometimes it hurts, but when you are Real you don’t mind being hurt. It doesn’t happen all at once. You become. Once you are Real you can’t be ugly, except to people who don’t understand. Once you are Real you can’t become unreal again. It lasts for always.
Margery Williams, The Velveteen Rabbit (via wordsnquotes)
fixyourwritinghabits
belt:

I like to have white or ambient noise playing while I study, so I thought I’d share a list of my favourite websites in case anyone else was interested.
Rainymood - Allows you to play rain, with suggestions of ambient music to play at the same time. Has an iOS and Android app, my personal favourite.
Calm - A visually beautiful website. Provides moving backgrounds and an option for guided calm which allows you to immerse yourself in the music and to relax. Has a free app for iPhone. Another one of my favourites.
Showertime - The experience of taking a shower without the water. Allows you to control features such as length of shower, size of room, water pressure, etc.
Coffitivity - The background noise of a coffee shop. Allows you to choose between different locations such as lunchtime lounge, morning murmur  etc. Has an app for iOS and Android as well as a desktop app for OS X.
Soundrown - A website with a sleek minimalist design, allows you to choose between rain, coffee shop, ocean, fire, bird noises, or a combination of the five.
Relaxing Snow - Visually beautiful falling snow, the website gives you the opinion to play music with the scenery, or to choose your own.
Raining.Fm - This website gives you the ability to adjust the rain to exactly how you’d like it, with options to tweak thunder, rain and storm noises. Has an app for iOS and Android, as well as a timer and snooze option.
Rain For Me - Simple rain effects with the option to download the audio files for offline listening.
Snowy Mood - Inspired by Rainy Mood, this website really makes you feel like it’s winter. Perfect for playing while snuggled up in a warm bed.
Rainy Cafe - Combines the sounds of a bustling cafe setting with the sounds of drizzling rain. Allows you to select the volume of each setting, or turn one off completely.

belt:

I like to have white or ambient noise playing while I study, so I thought I’d share a list of my favourite websites in case anyone else was interested.

  1. Rainymood - Allows you to play rain, with suggestions of ambient music to play at the same time. Has an iOS and Android app, my personal favourite.
  2. Calm - A visually beautiful website. Provides moving backgrounds and an option for guided calm which allows you to immerse yourself in the music and to relax. Has a free app for iPhone. Another one of my favourites.
  3. Showertime - The experience of taking a shower without the water. Allows you to control features such as length of shower, size of room, water pressure, etc.
  4. Coffitivity - The background noise of a coffee shop. Allows you to choose between different locations such as lunchtime lounge, morning murmur  etc. Has an app for iOS and Android as well as a desktop app for OS X.
  5. Soundrown - A website with a sleek minimalist design, allows you to choose between rain, coffee shop, ocean, fire, bird noises, or a combination of the five.
  6. Relaxing Snow - Visually beautiful falling snow, the website gives you the opinion to play music with the scenery, or to choose your own.
  7. Raining.Fm - This website gives you the ability to adjust the rain to exactly how you’d like it, with options to tweak thunder, rain and storm noises. Has an app for iOS and Android, as well as a timer and snooze option.
  8. Rain For Me - Simple rain effects with the option to download the audio files for offline listening.
  9. Snowy Mood - Inspired by Rainy Mood, this website really makes you feel like it’s winter. Perfect for playing while snuggled up in a warm bed.
  10. Rainy Cafe - Combines the sounds of a bustling cafe setting with the sounds of drizzling rain. Allows you to select the volume of each setting, or turn one off completely.
clevergirlhelps

anomalously-written:

[via[Advice from Jody Hedlund]

1. Develop our character before picking the name.
I fill out my character worksheet and get to know as much about my character as possible before deciding on a name. As I develop the character’s personality, ethnicity, quirks, life-experiences, etc., I’m able to narrow down names that might match that person. For example, in The Doctor’s Lady, my heroine is a well-educated, pious lady from a wealthy family. I chose the name Priscilla because it has a more refined and elegant ring than a name like Mary or Betty. 

2. Find names that match our setting and fit with the plot. 
Once my character is starting to come to life, I also evaluate how that character fits within the plot and setting. In my current WIP, which is set in the lumber communities of central Michigan, I sorted through rural names, as well as logging era names. And I tried to think which ones would fit within the tone of the plot.

3. Use time-period appropriate names.
This is especially critical for historical writers. I generally pull up the list of the most popular names for the year or decade in which my character was born. I also look at lists of names in biographies and research books for the particular time period of my book. In the 1600’s, 29% of men were named John (that’s about 1 out of 3 men!) and 15% of women were named Elizabeth. Thus, in The Preacher’s Bride I felt almost obligated to name my MC’s John and Elizabeth. Not really! But you get my point. 

4. Use symbolism if possible.
While we can’t always attach symbolism to names, we can look for ways to give special meaning to some of the names we choose. In my WIP, I looked at the meaning of hero names before choosing one. Whether the reader ever realizes it or not, part of my hero’s character arc is about him learning to live up to his name—which means “strong as a wolf.”

5. Avoid picking names that readers will have a difficult time saying.
I get annoyed when I read character names I can’t pronounce—oddly-spelled or too-long names. This is even more frustrating when the name belongs to the MC and I have to read the “weird” name ten times per page. I suggest avoiding names (as fun and nice as they might be) that might trip up our readers. We should also limit the number of foreign names for the same reason.

6. Avoid having names that start with the same letter or sound. 
I keep a running list of every character that crops up in my book—a sheet I can easily scan. I do my best to start each name with a different letter. I don’t want to have a John, Joseph, and Jacob all in the same book. Or a Polly and Molly. When names are too similar, we have to make our readers work harder to remember our characters. And our job as writers is to make the reading experience as smooth and pleasant as possible.

7. Remember, unique doesn’t always mean better.
Sometimes when names are too unique they can distract a reader from the story. I like unique last names, especially when they’re real (like Goodenough or Covenant). But often those kinds of names have a ring of disbelief. When I get too carried away, my editors send me back to the drawing board for a simpler name (as they did with the two examples I mentioned!). 

8. Make sure our minor character names don’t overshadow our main characters. 
It’s fun to find especially dark and sinister names for our antagonists. In The Doctor’s Lady, one of the bad guys is named Black Squire. He’s a rugged fur trapper that wears a black eye patch. The name fits. But, we have to make sure we don’t spend more time crafting the perfect names for lesser characters so that they become more vibrant and alive than the MC’s.

daughter-of-castile
daughter-of-castile:

queenelinormarie:

Eleanor of Plantagenet
Eleanor of Plantagenet (1162 – 1214) was Queen of Castile, wife of Alfonso VIII of Castile. She was the daughter of Henry II of England and his wife, Eleanor of Aquitaine.
When she was 14 years old, she was married to King Alfonso VIII of Castile in Burgos. The marriage had been arranged some years earlier; the couple were betrothed in 1170 but, because of Eleanor’s youth at that time, the wedding was delayed. The purpose of the marriage was to secure Aquitaine’s Pyrenean border. It is often repeated that the duchy of Gascony was her dowry, but there is no historical foundation for that claim. It is highly unlikely that Henry II would have parted with so significant a portion of his domains. At most, Gascony may have been pledged as security for the full payment of his daughter’s dowry. Decades later, her great grandson Alfonso X of Castile would claim the duchy on the grounds that her dowry had never been fully paid.
Of all Eleanor of Aquitaine’s daughters, her namesake Eleanor was the only one who was enabled, by political circumstances, to wield the kind of influence her mother had exercised. She was almost as powerful as her husband Alfonso, who specified in his will that she was to rule alongside their son in the event of his death. It was she who persuaded him to marry their daughter Berengaria to the King of Leon in the interest of peace.
When Alfonso died, his queen was reportedly so devastated with grief that she was unable to preside over the burial. Their eldest daughter Berengaria instead performed these honours. Eleanor then took sick and died only twenty-eight days after her husband, and was buried at Las Huelgas Abbey in Burgos.

My girl *.*.

daughter-of-castile:

queenelinormarie:

Eleanor of Plantagenet

Eleanor of Plantagenet (1162 – 1214) was Queen of Castile, wife of Alfonso VIII of Castile. She was the daughter of Henry II of England and his wife, Eleanor of Aquitaine.

When she was 14 years old, she was married to King Alfonso VIII of Castile in Burgos. The marriage had been arranged some years earlier; the couple were betrothed in 1170 but, because of Eleanor’s youth at that time, the wedding was delayed. The purpose of the marriage was to secure Aquitaine’s Pyrenean border. It is often repeated that the duchy of Gascony was her dowry, but there is no historical foundation for that claim. It is highly unlikely that Henry II would have parted with so significant a portion of his domains. At most, Gascony may have been pledged as security for the full payment of his daughter’s dowry. Decades later, her great grandson Alfonso X of Castile would claim the duchy on the grounds that her dowry had never been fully paid.

Of all Eleanor of Aquitaine’s daughters, her namesake Eleanor was the only one who was enabled, by political circumstances, to wield the kind of influence her mother had exercised. She was almost as powerful as her husband Alfonso, who specified in his will that she was to rule alongside their son in the event of his death. It was she who persuaded him to marry their daughter Berengaria to the King of Leon in the interest of peace.

When Alfonso died, his queen was reportedly so devastated with grief that she was unable to preside over the burial. Their eldest daughter Berengaria instead performed these honours. Eleanor then took sick and died only twenty-eight days after her husband, and was buried at Las Huelgas Abbey in Burgos.

My girl *.*.

anneboleyns

cyborgneboola:

Vietnamese Mythology Series┋[1/6] Creatures┋Hồ Ly Tinh

The Vietnamese fox spirits are most reminiscent of the Chinese Huli Jing (狐狸精) as well as the Korean Gumiho and Japanese Kitsune. Unlike the Gumihos, Hồ Ly Tinh's are not inherently malicious. These creatures have the ability to either inhibit the bodies of other humans but also acquire their own human forms if they are powerful enough. On top of shapeshifting, they also have the power of immortality.

They are mostly depicted as beautiful females who use their beauty to seduce mortals in order to steal their essence so they can sustain their powers. Where modern day Hanoi sits, there once was a fox spirit who inhabited a mountain. It often used its intelligence to trick people and lure them to come to it. Once away from other people, the Hồ Ly tinh would eat its victim.

#Inspiration

queenmaximas
ladytudorrose:

e-l-s-a-b-a:

stalinistqueens:

wingedbyday:

//Absurdly helpful for people writing royal characters and/or characters who interact with royalty and members of the nobility.
[x]

Citizen is simpler and more beautiful~ but just in case anyone needs this.

DUDE BUT THIS IS WHAT I’VE BEEN TRYING TO TELL PEOPLE
in medieval times you ONLY addressed a king/queen with “Your Majesty”, NEVER “Your Highness”.  To address a king/queen with “Your Highness” was considered an insult.

Actually “Your Majesty” started up in the Tudor era. Before that, Kings were often addresses as “Your Grace”, just like Dukes, because like Dukes they were property holders. 
Now today, Your Highness or Your Royal Highness would definitely be an insult to a monarch. Also Britain uses Royal Highness, some other countries use just Highness. 

ladytudorrose:

e-l-s-a-b-a:

stalinistqueens:

wingedbyday:

//Absurdly helpful for people writing royal characters and/or characters who interact with royalty and members of the nobility.

[x]

Citizen is simpler and more beautiful~ but just in case anyone needs this.

DUDE BUT THIS IS WHAT I’VE BEEN TRYING TO TELL PEOPLE

in medieval times you ONLY addressed a king/queen with “Your Majesty”, NEVER “Your Highness”.  To address a king/queen with “Your Highness” was considered an insult.

Actually “Your Majesty” started up in the Tudor era. Before that, Kings were often addresses as “Your Grace”, just like Dukes, because like Dukes they were property holders. 

Now today, Your Highness or Your Royal Highness would definitely be an insult to a monarch. Also Britain uses Royal Highness, some other countries use just Highness.